Archive for Samuel C. Doob

Catch-up: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962)

Posted in Catch-up with tags , , , , , , on January 29, 2010 by sdoob

 

Why I had never heard of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? before last week, I don’t know.  But I loved it.  

Baby Jane is one of those rare films that feels fragile.  It could have so easily been an embarrassment for everyone involved – especially Bette Davis, but for the studio and director Robert Aldrich, as well. Like with Davis’ character, Baby Jane Hudson, it is sad to watch someone who believes in herself (or himself) be terrible at what they do.  However, the movie succeeds beautifully! only to blow it in the second half.  But it’s still worth watching, definitely.    Continue reading

New Classic: Look Who’s Talking

Posted in New Classic with tags , , on January 26, 2010 by sdoob

First of all, don’t buy this at Wal-Mart.  It sucks.  The colors look like shit. 

Now, I’ll tell you why I love this movie: 

A.  It’s the only movie I’ve ever liked Travolta in, except when I was in denial about Pulp Fiction

B.  The soundtrack rocks me every time.

C. Kirstie Alley is a babe.  Especially in her aerobics outfit.  Continue reading

New Classic: Drag me to Hell

Posted in New Classic with tags , , , , on October 21, 2009 by sdoob

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My good friend, Timothy Parfitt, was very calm when he told me about Drag Me To Hell.  See, my tendency is to overwhelm people with my newfound fondness for a movie.  I have to tell everyone, “Have you seen Drag Me To Hell?  Oh you’ve got to.  It’s funny and scary and the main girl really holds it down.  It was just such a pleasure to see Sam Raimi return to form after putting in all that time with Spider-Man.  The movie – Drag Me To Hell – is the work of a master.  It’s like he had all this energy that’d been held back while working for Stan Lee.”  Too much, too much.  Why do I care so much if they see a good movie?  I sound desperate.  Timmy wasn’t like that.  He said, “It’s good,” like he just took a bite of a tuna sandwich I’d made for him.  He didn’t gush, but his opinion was firm.  He mentioned some of the things that I later felt: scary, funny, the Mac ad guy was appropriately cast.  But it was the minimalism of his recommendation that got me to see it.  I need to work on that.

New Classics: Moonstruck and Wayne’s World

Posted in Samuel C. Doob with tags , , , on September 23, 2009 by sdoob

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Maybe I should have picked Look Who’s Talking for my Modern Classic.  But I didn’t.  Moonstruck has been my gag reflex for the, “What’s your favorite movie?” question, for years.  Why?  I’d like to say, “Because it’s the best.”  But this is a review.  Saying, “It’s the best,” is not good enough; I have to explain my opinions. Continue reading

New Feature: New Classics

Posted in New Classic, Samuel C. Doob, Timothy Parfitt with tags , , , , , on September 19, 2009 by illwatchanything

We are excited to announce our new weekly feature: NEW CLASSICS. Each week, our IWA contributors will nominate two movies made since 1980, and will write short pieces explaining their pick and the importance of that film. Our definitive list will included fifty such classics. On Saturday, we (and hopefully, you the reader) will be able to vote on which five films deserve to be added to the canon. Any reader may leave a vote in the comments section and it will be counted against our own! Come give us hell.

Here is a preview of week one’s picks: Continue reading

“One for ‘Big Fan’”

Posted in "One for...", Samuel C. Doob with tags , , , on September 10, 2009 by sdoob

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I got really excited on the way to Big Fan.  I did not know, at the time, that the movie was directed Robert Siegal, writer of The Wrestler – a movie I enjoyed despite the parts I later found out were flooded with Jesus references.  I get a little tired of that shit.  (Watch the subway scene in Spider-Man 2.  Spider-Man is Jesus?  Come on.)   The starring performance is by Patton Oswalt whose voice I could not place.  It was so familiar though and thanks to the internet I found out he’s Remy, Star Rat in Ratatouille.  Conversely, thanks to Toy Story, whenever Tom Hanks yells dramatically in a movie (particularly when he parts with Wilson in Cast Away) I can only think of Woody.  Okay so getting to the point, I think this is the best way to write a review because I walked out.  I can’t ruin the ending.  Continue reading

You’ve never been to Wayne’s World

Posted in New Classic, Samuel C. Doob with tags , , on August 20, 2009 by sdoob

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Wayne’s World: I can’t say enough about it.  So I won’t say much.  There’s just so much love and warmth and great characters like Garth and Russell, Bunhjamin’s producer, that WW could still be a great movie without jokes.

Samuel C Doob

Whatever works, reviewed by Samuel C Doob

Posted in Review with tags , , on August 20, 2009 by sdoob

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It’s bad when you lose faith in someone you loved – someone you thought you respected.  (I’m referring, of course, to movie directors.)  How can you return to their earlier works when they just took a shit in your beer? as the expression goes.  I’m glad to say neither Larry David nor Woody Allen forced me to think such dismal thoughts while I sat in an underpopulated movie theater on the 4th of July.  Granted, the first ten minutes as Boris Yellnikoff (Larry David) rants at the camera, condescends to my popcorn consumption and so on, I wished I was watching Hannah And Her Sisters.  Anything with an actor.  Especially since Boris was written for Zero Mostel.  But then the movie improves.  Perhaps because there’s less focus on Boris.  I don’t know.  Evan Rachel Wood is the sleeper hit of the film, holding down the fort while Boris pontificates tirelessly.  (I did like it when he said we’re not even responsible for flushing the toilet anymore.)  Perhaps it was because of the lousy reviews, or my knowledge of David’s acting abilities, that I was so delighted when I did not hate Whatever Works.  If I had, I’d have probably sounded like Boris.

Negative Feedbacker, a review of The Limits of Control by Samuel C Doob

Posted in Review, Samuel C. Doob with tags , , on August 20, 2009 by sdoob

the limits of control, the new film by jim jarmusch (down by law, dead man) has no limits of boredom, failure and pretention.  after watching TLOC, one considers turning one’s back on jarmusch’s entire body of work.  it’s that bad.  there were two crumbs: 1) jarmusch, a filmmaker who likes his characters walking, can still pick ‘em.  his protagonist, lone man, is a good walker.  2) lone man’s love interest, nude, looks very good naked.   the bottom line: for about the last fifty to a hundred shots, i was hopeful yet certain that each shot was the last of the movie.  but when the final shot came and went, i felt let down.

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